レディー・ガガの卒業スピーチから英語をピックアップ~#BlackLivesMatter 黒人への人種差別に対する抗議活動から英語を学ぶ

2020年5月にアメリカのミネソタ州ミネアポリスで起こった、白人警官による黒人男性暴行死事件をきっかけに、黒人に対する人種差別への抗議活動(ブラック・ライブズ・マター運動)は全米、さらには世界各地に広がっています。このページでは、コロナウイルスの影響で卒業式が開かれなかった2020年の卒業生に向けた「Dear Class of 2020」レディー・ガガの祝辞スピーチから英語表現を紹介し、解説します。英語の全文と日本語訳付き。(全文はこちら

Greetings to graduates across the nation. This is Lady Gaga. Two weeks ago, I recorded a very different commencement speech to help celebrate the wonderful accomplishment that is your graduation. My speech at that time reflected and referenced the shared experience of the COVID-19 global pandemic that has devastated the world this year, and how important it is to be a force of kindness in the world as you take the next step forward in your promising lives. My speech was recorded before the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent activist movement protesting police brutality and systemic racism in this country.

アメリカ中の卒業生の皆さんへ。レディー・ガガです。2週間前、私は皆さんの卒業と言う素晴らしい偉業をお祝いするのを助ける、とても異なる卒業スピーチを録画しました。その時の私のスピーチは、今年世界を破壊したコロナウイルスという全世界的な感染症の共通の経験と、あなたたちが将来有望な人生において次のステップを前に踏み出す際に世界の中で優しさの力になることの大切さを反映し、述べたものでした。私のスピーチは、ジョージ・フロイドが殺され、それに続いてこの国における警察の残虐行為と構造的な人種差別に対する抗議行動が起こる前に録画されました。

新型コロナウイルスの影響で卒業式がキャンセルになった2020年度の卒業生のために、YouTubeが開催したバーチャル卒業式「Dear Class of 2020」に登壇したレディー・ガガ。祝辞の冒頭で、現在のBlack Lives Matter(ブラック・ライブズ・マター運動)のきっかけとなったジョージ・フロイドさんの事件よりも前に撮ったスピーチを撮り直していることを話しています。
“commencement speech” は「大学の卒業式のスピーチ」という意味です。アメリカの大学の卒業式では、よく有名な成功者を招いて卒業生に向けたスピーチを行います。スティーブ・ジョブズのスタンフォード大学での卒業スピーチも有名ですね。
レディー・ガガは、アメリカの人種差別のことを “systemic racism” という表現で表わしています。私は「構造的な人種差別」と訳しましたが、人種差別が個人の感情レベルではなく、社会の仕組み・システムに組み込まれていることを指しています。

While my original commencement speech may not be directly relevant to what this country needs most right now, I wish to tell you today that although there is much to be sad about, there is also much to be celebrated. You are watching what is a pivotal moment in this country’s evolution. You’re watching society change in a deeply important way. This change will be slow, and we will have to be patient. But change will happen, and it will be for the better. In rewriting my speech, I asked myself how I viewed racism in America as it relates to graduation. When I looked past the rage that I feel about this systemic oppression and physical and emotional violence that has tortured the Black community endlessly, my mind turned to nature.

私の元の卒業式のスピーチは、この国が今最も必要とするものは直接関係していないかもしれませんが、私が皆さんに今日伝えたいのは、悲しむべきことがたくさんある一方で、祝福すべきこともたくさんあるということです。皆さんはこの国の進化の中で極めて重要な瞬間を目撃しています。根本的で重要な社会の変化を目にしているのです。この変化には時間がかかるでしょう。なので私たちは我慢強くなければならないでしょう。しかし変化は起こります。より良い方向への変化です。スピーチを書き直しながら、私は卒業と関連して自分がどのようにアメリカの人種差別をとらえているか自分に問いました。私がこの構造的な抑圧や、黒人の人たちのコミュニティを永遠に苦しめてきた肉体的、心理的な暴力に対して感じる怒りの後ろに目を向けた時、私の頭は自然へと向かいました。

次に続くメッセージから取り上げるのは “This change will be slow, and we will have to be patient.” という一文です。slowはfastの反対で、「遅い、時間がかかる」という意味です。patientは「我慢強い、忍耐強い」という意味の形容詞です。(同じ単語ですが名詞だと「患者」という意味になります。)今の抗議運動はアメリカ国内で大きな盛り上がりを見せていますが、人種差別問題の解決という実際の変化はすぐには起こらない、時間がかかることを覚悟しなければならないと言っています。

When I think about racism in America, I imagine a broad forest filled densely with tall trees, trees as old as this country itself, trees that were planted with racist seeds, trees that grew prejudice branches and oppressive leaves and mangled roots that buried and entrenched themselves deep within the soil, forming a web so well-developed and so entangled that pushes back when we try to look clearly at how it really works. This forest is where we live. It’s who we are. It’s the morals and values systems that we as a society have upheld and emboldened for centuries. I make this analogy between racism and nature in this country, because it’s as pervasive and as real as nature. It is some part of everything the light touches. But in this moment, all of us are being invited to challenge that system and think about how to affect real change.

私がアメリカの人種差別を考える時、高い木々が密集して覆う広い森を想像します。それは、この国自身と同じくらい古く、人種差別の種と共に植えられた木であり、偏見の枝と抑圧的な葉、自らを土壌の中に埋め、固定させたずたずたの根を生やす木です。それらはあまりにもよく発達し絡まった交錯した網を形成しており、私たちがどうなっているかはっきり見ようとしても押し返されるほどです。この森が私たちが住むところであり、私たち自身なのです。これが、私たちが社会として何世紀にもわたり守り、勢いづかせてきたモラルと価値の仕組みなのです。私がこの国の人種差別を自然に例えて説明するのは、それが自然と同じくらい隅々まで行き渡っていて、現実のものだからです。光が触れるすべてのものに、そういった部分があるのです。しかしこの瞬間、私たちはみなこの仕組みに挑み、真の変化にどのように影響を与えるかについて考えるように招かれています。

1つ目の下線部分は so that 構文で、so A(形容詞) that … 「あまりにAなので・・・だ」と訳します。レディー・ガガはこの部分でアメリカの人種問題を自然・森に例えて話していますが、現在の社会問題である人種差別は、これまでに形成されてきたアメリカ社会の中の様々な点で深く複雑に絡まっており、簡単には解き明かすことができないと言っています。
2つ目の下線、“invited” は非常に英語らしい表現だと思って選びました。この問題に立ち向かうことを、askを使って「求められる、お願いされる」という言い方ではなく、「招く、誘う」という意味の “invite” を使っています。これには、行動を起こすのは自分自らの意志によってであり、そういった機会を提示されているというニュアンスが読み取れます。

I believe in my heart that the people who are going to make this change happen are listening to me speak right now. I know this is true because it’s you who are the seeds of the future. You are the seeds that will grow into a new and different forest that is far more beautiful and loving than the one we live in today.

私は心から、この変化を起こす人々が今私が話すのを聞いてくれていると信じています。なぜならあなたこそが未来の種だから、私はそれが本当だとわかっています。あなたは、今日私たちが住む森よりもずっと美しくて愛のこもった、新しく違った森へと育つ種なのです。

“it’s you who are the seeds of the future” の部分は “you are the seeds of future” という言い方もできますが、“it’s you…”と始めて you を協調できるように、関係代名詞のwhoを使った表現にしています。卒業生たちを「未来の種」と表し、今とは違う森へと育つようにメッセージを送っています。

(※中略 動画6:11~)What do we do now? My answer of kindness is simple, but it’s mine, because right now, more than usual, we’re trying to talk to each other. Let’s talk. But just as you did in your classrooms almost every day, let’s also listen. If we don’t listen, we don’t learn. Congratulations to the class of 2020. I can’t wait to see your forest.

今、私たちは何をすればいいのでしょうか?私の優しさの答えはシンプルですが、それは私の答えです。なぜなら今、普段より一層、私たちはお互いに話そうとしています。だから話しましょう。しかしほぼ毎日教室であなたがしていたように、耳も傾けましょう。私たちは聞かなければ学びません。2020年卒業生の皆さん、おめでとうございます。あなたの森を見るのが待ちきれません。

メッセージの最後でガガは、話すこと(talk)と聞くこと(listen)の大切さを訴え、今は未来の種である卒業生たちが将来つくる森(your forest)を見るのが楽しみだと締めくくっています。
これまでも自分のメッセージを積極的に発信してきたレディー・ガガ。このBlack Lives Matter(ブラック・ライブズ・マター)についても、自分の言葉で力強いメッセージを語っていましたね。話し方も1つ1つの単語をクリアに話しているので、ノンネイティブにとっても聞きやすいのではないかな、と思います。

<スピーチ英語全文>

“Greetings to graduates across the nation. This is Lady Gaga. Two weeks ago, I recorded a very different commencement speech to help celebrate the wonderful accomplishment that is your graduation. My speech at that time reflected and referenced the shared experience of the COVID-19 global pandemic that has devastated the world this year, and how important it is to be a force of kindness in the world as you take the next step forward in your promising lives. My speech was recorded before the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent activist movement protesting police brutality and systemic racism in this country.

While my original commencement speech may not be directly relevant to what this country needs most right now, I wish to tell you today that although there is much to be sad about, there is also much to be celebrated. You are watching what is a pivotal moment in this country’s evolution. You’re watching society change in a deeply important way. This change will be slow, and we will have to be patient. But change will happen, and it will be for the better. In rewriting my speech, I asked myself how I viewed racism in America as it relates to graduation. When I looked past the rage that I feel about this systemic oppression and physical and emotional violence that has tortured the Black community endlessly, my mind turned to nature.

When I think about racism in America, I imagine a broad forest filled densely with tall trees, trees as old as this country itself, trees that were planted with racist seeds, trees that grew prejudice branches and oppressive leaves and mangled roots that buried and entrenched themselves deep within the soil, forming a web so well-developed and so entangled that pushes back when we try to look clearly at how it really works. This forest is where we live. It’s who we are. It’s the morals and values systems that we as a society have upheld and emboldened for centuries. I make this analogy between racism and nature in this country, because it’s as pervasive and as real as nature. It is some part of everything the light touches. But in this moment, all of us are being invited to challenge that system and think about how to affect real change.

I believe in my heart that the people who are going to make this change happen are listening to me speak right now. I know this is true because it’s you who are the seeds of the future. You are the seeds that will grow into a new and different forest that is far more beautiful and loving than the one we live in today. I believe the path forward to eradicating the blight of racism relies on three principles, which form the basis of my faith and my perspective on nature and what I believe humanity needs to thrive.

These three things are time, sufficient effort, and divine grace. We need these three things to be replanted anew, whole, and with full hearts, healed, and inspired as a country, as a forest of seeds that have been mutated, nurtured by new and ingenious ways of watering, and divine intervention that speaks to us all through the great Mother Nature with a voice of compassion. We can control time and sufficient effort. We cannot control divine grace, but I believe divine grace is the faith we can choose to place in each other to prosper lovingly and effectively.

I believe you beautiful seeds have been presented with a wonderful gift. The opportunity to reflect on this powerful moment, on your morals, your principles, and your values and how they will guide you through life as it presents itself. And as you wonder where it will take you. Your morals, principles, and values I strongly believe now must be sincere and authentic to you. Your principles must come from your heart, your values must come from your brain, your morals must be derived from the whole you that you contribute lovingly to humanity. Your service to the global community will be kindness that’s custom-made by you for the world.

In my original speech, I asked the question: ‘What will it take to be kind all the time?’ Perhaps this question is still relevant today. I wish to frame this answer by saying something seemingly obvious on an occasion where you’ve already proven yourself smart, capable humans. People can do hard things. You can do hard things. You can rip up and replant the forest to be a vision only you have. Sometimes being kind is hard. I’m sure you could think of a few unkind classmates, friends, family members, strangers, people, teachers from your school, or even times that you’ve acted unkindly. Even if you’ve witnessed, though, a lack of kindness, still, moreover, that does not cannibalize the ability for people to do hard things. So since being kind can mean doing a hard thing, sometimes, in the absence of kindness, people can still do the hard thing and be kind. I encourage you to be kind. I do this to set the example I wish to with the tremendous privilege I have in giving you this commencement speech today.

When I include that bit about kindness, that’s me making sure during this moment between us that I am equipped with my morals, values, and principles for a very important topic. What do we do now? My answer of kindness is simple, but it’s mine, because right now, more than usual, we’re trying to talk to each other. Let’s talk. But just as you did in your classrooms almost every day, let’s also listen. If we don’t listen, we don’t learn. Congratulations to the class of 2020. I can’t wait to see your forest.”

It's fun to share! Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Email this to someone
email
Print this page
Print

あわせて読みたい